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Dr. Marya Lieberman


Got Fakes? Paper Test Cards for Detection of Low Quality Pharmaceuticals

February 8, 2017

Location: Access Grid, All SPACT Campuses

Falsified and substandard pharmaceuticals are common in countries that lack the technological and regulatory infrastructure needed to detect them.  Dr. Lieberman and her colleagues  have developed paper analytical devices (PADs) for field screening of dosage forms of antibiotics and other medicines in low resource settings.   Dr. Lieberman will describe how her research group designed these cards for manufacturability and implemented them in a large scale survey of antibiotic quality in western Kenya.

 

Bio:


Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry
University of Notre Dame


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Dr. Brandon Sullivan


Developing Evidence-Based Approaches to Anti-Counterfeiting Strategy

October 11, 2016

Location: Access Grid, All SPACT Campuses

Product counterfeiting represents a growing, global risk that poses many negative consequences for consumers, businesses, governments, national security, the economy, and society as a whole.  Research and field experience contend that the most effective anti-counterfeiting approaches are strategic, proactive, and comprehensive, using evidence and analysis to shrink counterfeiting opportunities.  The Michigan State University Center for Anti-Counterfeiting and Product Protection (A-CAPP) is focused on developing strategies to effectively detect, deter, and respond to the complex global issues of anti-counterfeiting and product protection of all products, across all industries, in all markets.  Brand owners, government agencies, professional associations, and others share in the challenge of responding to counterfeit products.  The A-CAPP Center serves as an independent, interdisciplinary, evidence-based hub, offering research, educational programs, information, and partnership opportunities designed to assist in protecting brands and products of all industries worldwide.  This seminar provides an overview of the unique contributions of the A-CAPP Center to industry, government, and academia, and highlights the challenges of assessing product counterfeit risks and developing anti-counterfeiting strategies to mitigate those risks.

Bio:


Brandon A. Sullivan is an Assistant Professor at the Michigan State University Center for Anti-Counterfeiting and Product Protection (A-CAPP).  He earned his PhD from the Michigan State University School of Criminal Justice in 2015 and his Bachelor and Master of Science in Criminal Justice from Bowling Green State University.  In addition to his work with the A-CAPP Center, he serves a Research Associate with the Research Foundation of the City University of New York (CUNY), Research Affiliate with the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), and Faculty Affiliate with the MSU College of Law.  He is also co-Principal Investigator and Project Manager for the U.S. Extremist Crime Database (ECDB) Financial Crimes project.  His research focuses primarily on emerging areas of crime and justice, particularly those involving transnational criminal enterprises and networks, including fraud, product counterfeiting, extremist financial crime, and environmental/conservation crime.  Other research interests include organizational deviance, crime prevention, policing, law and society, and media and crime, as well as social network analysis and mixed methods research.

http://a-capp.msu.edu/content/brandon-sullivan


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Mr. Bill Cheswick


Computer Security: I Think We Can Win!

October 3, 2016

Location: Access Grid, All SPACT Campuses

By a number of important measures, the Internet is working spectacularly well. But there is crime and espionage as well, and the attackers are highly capable, motivated, and spectacularly successful. Meanwhile, experienced security people despair. The same bugs seem to persist, the lessons of the past ignored or forgotten.  Despite the incredible progress of Moore’s Law, our software isn’t much better than thirty years ago. This is going to get better over the coming decades. We have tools and techniques we haven’t explored or deployed very far. We can get the upper hand—yes, it is possible to write a secure program.

 

Bio:



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Mr. Jason Daniels


Introduction to Health and Safety Consequences of Intellectual Property Crime

July 27, 2016

Location: Access Grid, All SPACT Campuses

Bio:


Jason Daniels is the Senior Investigations Manager with Underwriters Laboratories’ Global Security & Brand Protection Unit. His primary responsibility is to facilitate intellectual property theft investigations in the Americas and lend support to the EMEA. Mr. Daniels has focused his efforts on combatting counterfeiting for over 14 years. He has written curriculum that has been presented throughout the United States concerning fraud investigations and has been a law enforcement instructor for over 18 years. Prior to entering the corporate arena Mr. Daniels was a sworn law enforcement officer in the State of North Carolina. His last assignment as Special Agent in Charge with the Secretary of State’s Office. He is a graduate of Shaw University and continued his educational development at the University of Louisville and Michigan State University.


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Mr. George Gibson


Smart Packaging for Brand Protection & Anti-Counterfeiting

July 6, 2016

Location: Access Grid, All SPACT campuses

Bio:


Director for Marketing Strategy, PARC, A Xerox Company, Rochester, NY


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Mr. James Klatt


Intellectual Property Rights Overview

June 22, 2016

Location: Access Grid---All SPACT Campuses

Bio:


Supervisory Special Agent, Intellectual Property and Cyber-enable Crimes Unit, Federal Bureau of Investigation


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Mr. Lars Suneborn


Securing Biometrics in Physical Access Control Systems (PACS)

June 8, 2016

Location: Access Grid, All SPACT Campuses

Bio:


Mr. Suneborn is Director, Training Programs for the Smart Card Alliance. He coordinates instructors and lead updates to the Alliance’s Certification Courses and is currently establishing The Smart Card Alliance Education Center in Crystal City, VA. He is the Instructor for the Certified System Engineer ICAM PACS, CSEIP Certification Course.

Prior to joining the Smart Card Alliance, during his 30 + year career in the security industry, Mr. Suneborn have served in various capacities with HIRSCH Electronics, Oberthur Technologies and has become recognized as a Physical Access Control System (PACS) subject matter leader. Suneborn is a frequent speaker and an active member of the SCA ACC. Suneborn developed and conducted customized, agency specific week-long training courses and courseware as well as Train-the-Trainer activities for a wide variety of US, Canadian and British security agencies at facilities worldwide. Suneborn is often specifically requested by name for specialized training requirements.

Suneborn is actively promoting Smart Card, biometric and PKI cryptographic technologies as vital components in overall system designs for high-risk, high-security facilities nationally and internationally. He is guiding US agencies in their efforts to achieve HSPD-12/ FICAM compliance.


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Dr. Hugh Britten


Potential Uses for DNA Biomarkers in Artifact and Document Authentication

April 7, 2016

Location: Access Grid, All SPACT Campuses

Bio:


Professor, Department of Biology, University of South Dakota


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Mr. Fredrick Ochieng


Fast Isotope Ratios Mass Spectrometry (FIRMS): A Rapid Method for the Determination of Counterfeit Pharmaceuticals

March 17, 2016

Location: Access Grid---All SPACT Campuses

Bio:


Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, South Dakota State University


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Mr. Jared Goodwin


Enabling the American Dream – An Overview of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ Secure Identification Document and Printing Program

January 13, 2016

Location: Access Grid---All SPACT Campuses

Bio:


Division Chief, Document Management Division, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services


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Dr. P. Stanley May


Recent Advances in Upconversion Nanoparticle Inks in Security Printing

December 3, 2015

Location: Access Grid---All SPACT Campuses

Bio:


Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of South Dakota


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Mr. Takaharu Kobayashi


Structural Color for Security Printing: Patterned Robust Colloidal Crystals

November 19, 2015

Location: Access Grid---All SPACT Campuses

Bio:


Research Institute of National Printing Bureau (Japan)


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Mr. Forest Thompson


Porous-wall Hollow Glass Microspheres for Security Printing Applications

November 4, 2015

Location: Access Grid--All SPACT Campuses

Bio:


M.S. Degree Candidate, Materials Engineering and Science Program, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology


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Dr. Brian Logue


Countering Counterfeiting of Drugs: Unique Fluorescent Inks for Direct Printing onto Pharmaceuticals

October 28, 2015

Location: Access Grid---All SPACT Campuses

Bio:


Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, South Dakota State University


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Dr. Jennifer Pazour


Smart Logistics Systems and Their Need for Security

October 21, 2015

Location: Access Grid---All SPACT Campuses

Bio:


Assistant Professor, Industrial and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute


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Mr. Jacob Petersen


Upconverting Nanoparticle Security Inks Based on Hansen Solubility Parameters

October 15, 2015

Location: Access Grid -All SPACT Campuses

Upconverting Nanoparticle Security Inks Based on Hansen Solubility Parameters

Bio:


Ph.D. Candidate, Materials Engineering and Science Program, SD School of Mines and Technology


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Mr. Daniel DiMase


Ensuring Cyber Physical System Security

July 24, 2015

Location: Access Grid, All SPACT Campuses

Bio:


Director of Compliance and Quality, Honeywell International Inc.


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Dr. Cedric Neumann


Application of Functional Data Analysis to Chemical Data ~ Comparison, Classification and Database Search of Forensic Ink Chromatograms

July 9, 2015

Location: Access Grid All SPACT campuses

Ink examination is used in a variety of criminal investigations. Types of ink examination include identification, comparison, and dating. In this presentation, we concentrate on the identification and comparison of ink samples. Identifying ink samples is a very complex problem. Not only are there many types of inks in existence, but ink with the same formula can be used in multiple models of pens from multiple brands and manufacturers. Other problems can affect the comparison between ink samples, such as the degradation of ink samples due to time and other environmental factors.

Mathematical algorithms have already been developed to automatically compare an ink sample with other samples in a database with the goal of determining the brands, models, and years of manufacture of pens that could have produced the sample. Most often these algorithms assume some multivariate distribution of the ink characteristics and use some data reduction technique to show that inks can be differentiated in quasi-ideal situations. In this presentation, we propose a new approach to mathematically describe ink samples using functional data analysis. This method does not make any assumption on the data and can account for less than ideal samples.
Functional data analysis is a fairly new statistical method which deals with data of functional nature. Such data often arises during chromatographic or spectroscopic analysis of material of forensic interest, where the data is represented as a function of time. In this particular case, we characterize the chromatograms of ink samples produced by High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography as functions of time and wavelength. We built and tested several algorithms to register multiple ink samples that were analyzed at different times, or by different analysts, into a common space, compare ink samples using a metric of similarity, and to use these comparisons to cluster large databases of inks. Our algorithms can readily be implemented to search an unknown ink sample and retrieve a list of ink samples most similar to the ink sample in question. Finally, we note that similar algorithms can be developed for most forensic chromatographic or spectroscopic applications.

*This research is based upon the MSc research of Mr. Riley Burfield

Bio:


Assistant Professor,
South Dakota State University, Department of Mathematics and Statistics


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Mr. James Rattling Leaf, Sr.


Counterfeit Indian Arts and Crafts

July 1, 2015

Location: Access Grid (all SPACT campuses)

Bio:


B.S. University of Colorado-Boulder

Rattling Leaf Consulting, LLC


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Dr. Norm Braaten


Responsible Conduct in Research

June 3, 2015

Location: Access Grid (all SPACT campuses)

Faculty and students must strive to act with integrity in all they do. In the process of carrying out research activities, the SPACT Center must comply with federal and state regulations and policies. Individual SPACT research investigators also must comply with all those regulations, polices and procedures governing research.  The seminar will review the relevant responsible conduct in research.

Bio:


SDSU Research Compliance Coordinator


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Dr. Jeevan Meruga


Authentication Applications using Smartphones

April 24, 2015

Location: Access Grid (all SPACT campuses)

In today’s world, smartphones are ubiquitous. Associated hardware and software security applications are emerging, particularly with regard to authentication. In this seminar, Jeevan Meruga discusses some of the most current built-in features and external attachments of smartphones that could turn them into authentication devices, and offers preliminary data to show the potential of the smart phone for these applications.

Bio:


Post-Doctoral Researcher, Center for Security Printing and Anti-Counterfeiting Technology


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Mr. Martin Kenner


With the Increasing Incidence of Counterfeiting and Simulation of Goods, Why is it so Hard to Sell Security?

April 17, 2015

Location: Access Grid (all SPACT campuses)

Law enforcement and border management agencies around the world have clearly demonstrated the increasing incidence of both counterfeiting and simulation of material goods.  The financial impact of these is enormous, as is the risk to product brands.  Despite this evidence, product manufacturers and brand owners remain a difficult sell when it comes to incorporation of security features into product of packaging.

I will discuss some of the factors that contribute to this apparent conundrum from both sides of the issue – as a technical leader in a security business and as a technical leader of a product business, both within 3M.  While I don’t pretend to have the answers to all questions, I hope to convey information that will help build an understanding of the business issues and therefore help the SPACT team plan to address the business issues as they address the technical issues when developing security solutions.

Bio:


Global Laboratory Manager, Public Security Business, 3M


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Ms. Pamela Pressman


A Holistic Approach to Protecting Intellectual Property

April 10, 2015

Location: Access Grid (all SPACT campuses)

In today’s global marketplace, protecting intellectual property (IP) is daunting. With a click of an email, trade secrets can be shared with competitors. A supply chain oversight can lead to counterfeit parts and faulty products. A coveted technology can be copied and immediately distributed around the world.

In this seminar, Pamela Passman, President and CEO of the Center for Responsible Enterprise And Trade (CREATe.org), shares insights into how to take a holistic approach to IP protection. She will discuss how to identify, assess and manage IP-related risks; outline the elements of an effective IP protection framework; and share examples of how companies, researchers and organizations can take proactive steps to prevent the loss of valuable assets.

Bio:


President and CEO
Center for Responsible Enterprise and Trade – CREATe.org


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Dr. Mengyu Qiao


Touchscreen-based User Authentication Using Hand Biometrics

March 6, 2015

Location: Access Grid (all SPACT campuses)

User authentication plays an indispensable role in protecting computer systems and applications, but the development of touchscreen hardware and the user habit change post requirements for new authentication methods. Based on an extensive study of touchscreen hardware and biometric patterns, we present a robust user authentication scheme using biometric features of touch gestures. Discriminative features are extracted from the touch-point data, and used in statistical analysis for verification. We tested our scheme in a variety of experiments that involved multiple volunteers to perform various gestures. The analysis of experimental results and user feedback indicate that the new scheme delivers comprehensive measurements and accurate pattern classification for user authentication.

Bio:


Assistant Professor
Mathematics and Computer Science
South Dakota School of Mines and Technology


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Mr. Daniel Stanton


Managing Risk in Global Supply Chains

November 21, 2014

Location: Access Grid (all SPACT campuses)

Supply chain risk is a critical issue for manufacturing companies, retailers, and consumers. In a global market with constant cost pressures, companies need to implement cost effective strategies for securing their supply chains. Daniel Stanton is VP of Education and Professional Development for MHI, the largest association of supply chain companies in the US. Mr. Stanton will address this challenge with us, discussing the recently published US Roadmap for Material Handling and Logistics, and providing case studies and models that reflect some of the challenges and opportunities facing businesses today.

Bio:


Vice President, Education and Professional Development

MHI


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Mr. Jacob Petersen


Hansen Solubility Parameters for Development of Optically Variable Security Inks

November 7, 2014

Location: Access Grid (all SPACT campuses)

Modern security inks incorporate nanoparticles with novel properties to increase the complexity of a security ink for the purpose of preventing counterfeit production. Typically the nanoparticles used are dispersed in a polymer matrix to form a mechanically robust device while maintaining the unique properties of said nanoparticles. Dispersing nanoparticles in a given ink has typically relied on generically matching the polarity of the nanoparticle capping agent to that of the polymer and solvents used to print the ink. This research focused on identifying a quantitative approach to dispersing nanoparticles through characterizing the Hansen Solubility Parameters (HSPs) of various nanoparticles synthesized for security inks. Once HSPs were obtained, solvents and polymers were chosen to form an optimal security ink. The printed nanoparticle film microstructure was varied by controlling the ink HSPs throughout evaporation to form continuous, discontinuous, and disrupted film microstructures. Finally, an optically variable ink was produced as a proof of concept.

Bio:


Ph.D. Candidate, Materials Engineering and Science Program, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology


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Dr. Judy Zaichkowsky


The Psychology Behind Trademark Infringement and Counterfeiting

October 7, 2014

Location: Access Grid (all SPACT campuses)

Bio:


Professor of Marketing in the Beedie School of Business
Simon Fraser University


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Dr. George Wicks


Porous Wall Hollow Glass Microspheres…..New Materials for New Applications in Energy, Environmental Remediation, Defense and Medicine

September 18, 2014

Location: Access Grid: All SPACT Campuses

A new class of materials, called Porous Wall Hollow Glass Microspheres (PWHGMs), was developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory.  These tiny glass micro-balloons are about one-half the diameter of a human hair and can range in size from 2 to 100 microns.  The thin outer shells are about one micron thick and what makes these microspheres one-of-a-kind is that the team has been able to induce and control an interconnected, through-wall porosity, on a scale of 100 to 1,000 Angstroms.  This porosity is then used to fill the microspheres with a variety of materials, including solids, liquids and gases, which result in unique composites having a variety of unique properties. This microsphere technology has been involved in more than a dozen different programs and applications in areas of energy, environmental remediation, defense and in medicine.  PWHGMs have been patented, licensed, and are now being advanced for commercialization in various areas and disciplines, at the Applied Research Center of SC.

Bio:


Adj. Prof., GA Health Sciences Univ/ GA Regents University/Wicks Consulting


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Mr. Takaharu Kobayashi


Banknote Manufacturing: Integration of Security

September 5, 2014

Location: Access Grid (All SPACT Campuses)

Banknotes are protected by many kinds of security features because they are important infrastructure that maintain economic activities and daily life. This seminar will consider the essence of banknote security through introduction of security features and manufacturing processes.

Bio:


SPACT Visiting Scientist (National Printing Bureau, Japan)


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Dr. Douglas Wells


Photon Activation Analysis and its Potential Forensic, Authentication and Security Applications

July 30, 2014

Location: Access Grid: All SPACT campuses

Nuclear activation analysis using neutrons, charged particles and photons has a long history, with many applications in environmental, cultural and forensic disciplines.   Each has their respective relative advantages, depending on the application.   In the case of photons from electron-beam bremsstrahlung, advantages which may enable forensic and materials/parts authentication and security applications.  These include (a) high penetrability, enabling analysis of
larger objects that are nearly uniformly activated, (b) non-destructive analysis of high-value or irreplaceable objects and materials, (c) production of shorter activation half-lives that enable more rapid return of objects and materials to their owners and (d) highly-directional beams that could readily function in industrial settings.   These particular advantages have only been partially exploited.   There remain many important applications that have never been fully explored or exploited.   Among these are (i) industrial, criminal and arms-control forensics, (ii) authentication applications in medicine and industry, (iii) provenance applications archaeology, paleontology and museum sciences, (iv) contraband attribution and interdiction, (v) mining and hazardous/precious waste assay, (vi) environmental studies in pollution fate and transport and (vii) nuclear non-proliferation.   This talk will focus on opportunities and potential of some these applications and the state of the art in these areas.

Bio:


Dean of Graduate Education and Professor of Physics
South Dakota School of Mines and Technology


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Dr. Sara Church


Extreme Document Security - The Challenges of Protecting Currency

July 18, 2014

Location: Access Grid: All SPACT campuses

The seminar covered the complexities of protecting banknotes, their functional uses and present a way of thinking about those uses, counterfeit deterrence and authentication requirements.

Bio:


Banknote Scientist at Board of Governors, Federal Reserve System (retired)


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Dr. Steven Simske


Security Printing Technologies, Competing with Zero

July 15, 2014

Location: Access Grid: All SPACT campuses

Security Printing technologies are enabled by variable data printing (VDP) available on all modern presses. When considering any security printing approach, you must be ready to potentially compete with zero—that is, zero incremental cost for security. The broad set of VDP based security printing approaches will be outlined in this talk, along with the ecosystem in which they function. I will show that zero cost is not always the optimum solution.

Bio:


Steven is an HP Fellow in the Printing and Content Delivery Lab (PCDL), and is the Director and Chief Technologist for the HP Labs Enterprise Round-tripping through Imaging and Classification for an Integrated Document Lifecycle Ecosystem (ERIC IDLE) program, which includes HP Lab’s Document Lifecycle and Security Printing portfolios.


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Dr. Sunghoon Kwon


Color-barcoded Magnetic Microparticles

July 2, 2014

Location: Access Grid (all SPACT campuses)

Bio:


Associate Professor, Seoul National University


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Mr. Ian Lancaster


Counterfeiting & Authentication: An Overview

May 9, 2014

Location: Access Grid (all SPACT campuses)

Bio:


Director, Reconnaissance International


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Dr. Manki Min


Cryptography and Product Authentication

April 11, 2014

Location: Access Grid (all SPACT campuses)

In this presentation, we introduce fundamental cryptographic functions such as public-key encryptions, cryptographic hash functions, message authentication codes, and digital signatures that can be used for authentication purpose. Then we discuss some examples of product authentication schemes which consists of cryptography and RFID systems.

Bio:


Assistant Professor, Computer Science Program, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, South Dakota State University


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Dr. Haeyeon Yang


Basics of Holography & Applications to Security

March 28, 2014

Location: Access Grid (all SPACT campuses)

Holography has been used in various applications since its invention in 1940s by Dennis Gabor and others. Its importance has been recognized by the Nobel Prize in Physics awarded to Gabor in 1971. In this talk, basic aspects of creating holograms will be introduced. The current state of the art will be addressed, mainly based on the talks on practical holography presented at the conference of Photonics West on February 2014. Potential holography projects for security application will be discussed.

Bio:


Associate Professor, Department of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology


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Dr. Julie Yingling


Methamphetamine Markets: Roles, Structure, and Arrest Avoidance Strategies of Members

February 28, 2014

Location: Access Grid (all SPACT campuses)

This qualitative study of male and female methamphetamine manufacturers examines what positions exist within markets, the fluidity of those roles, and positions available to women.  This study also examines the different strategies men and women use to prevent detection by law enforcement.  Lastly, these strategies are compared to local law enforcement’s experiences and understanding of the methamphetamine manufacturing process.

Bio:


Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology & Rural Studies, South Dakota State University


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Dr. Mengyu Qiao


Multimedia Authentication and Forensics

February 14, 2014

Location: Access Grid (all SPACT campuses)

Product counterfeiting is a well-known problem, which has done significant damage to the production and distribution of physical goods for a very long time. In the past decade, the use of multimedia applications has significantly increased because of the advance in network bandwidth and storage capacity, and the use of smartphone makes rich-content applications further penetrate into daily life.  Due to the ubiquitous availability of editing software for digital media, manipulation skills of digital media have been simplified and spreading extensively, which weakens our traditional trust to the integrity of digital media.  Nowadays, forgery and piracy have become the major challenges to the applications of digital media.  Therefore, various types of technologies have been developed to protect both physical and virtual products and counteract these growing threats.  In this talk, I will introduce some vulnerabilities and potential attacks on digital media, and then discuss some mainstream approaches to authenticate digital media and protect its integrity. Furthermore, I will also talk about the some digital forensic research on analysis of fake and tampered media to reveal some trace and evidence for law enforcement and justice. Although this talk will mainly focus on digital media, some discussed solutions are also applicable to printed labels and tags.

Bio:


Assistant Professor, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology